Pictures by Walter

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At the Feeder.. 29-4-2016

“Chez Walter” feeding station is now attracting the smaller garden birds along with Magpie (Pica pica),   Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), Woodpigeon (Columba palumbus).  The ravages of winter have been repaired, though some work remains.  Broken feeders replaced, water features repaired and new gnomes adopted.  The larger birds soon came back as did the Starlings. However the smaller garden/woodland birds had not been seen since September last year.  Today 29th April “Chez Walter” had 7 specie of birds to the feeders.  First (as usual|) was the;

20160418-_DSC8517-EditWoodpigeon (Columba palumbus) in the rain

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Two special birds returned: one small garden bird the smallest Tit in UK :

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One of my firm favourites the Coal Tit (Parus ater).  The little bird flits in and out very quickly, pausing for s second or two to check out the area for danger.  Makes a quick flt to the feeder – usually for the Sunflower Seeds, gets one and flits out again.  Rarely does it pause to eat the seed in my smallish trees – it heads fro higher and safer spots.  A welcome return wsa also extended to a larger woodland bird the Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto). 20160429-_MG_8030-Edit

Whilst the little Coal Tit is mostly Grey and black with white patches, the Collared Dove is almost all grey with a pinkish-buff Collar-band round the neck.  Perhaps a bit bland for most tastes however in sunshine the birds feathers take on a lustre and the ruby eyes  light up and sparkle.

 

 


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Return of the Dunnock

Woodpigeon (Columba palumbus) in the rain

Woodpigeon (Columba palumbus) in the rain

Nine days ago his lordship “Blackbird (turdus mecula) cast his eyes over the refurbished “Chez Walter” feeding stations and declared them open for business.  Whilst two Magpies (Pica pica) and a couple of Woodpigeon (Columba palumbus) have dined at “Chez Walter” no small birds had made an appearance or booking.   This changed today with the visit of not one but two  little Dunnoocks (Prunella modularis), a small drab brown bird with a lot of hop and swagger.   The Dunnock may have a drab colour scheme to some to me it is perfectly attired for its environment.  A ground feeder it likes to hide in vegetation.  A perky little bird and may be confused with wren or sparrow at first glance.

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